Treasury Department and IRS Release Final Rules for Clean Energy Jobs

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The US Department of the Treasury and the IRS announced this week final rules on prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements under the Inflation Reduction Act.…
American clean jobs inflation reduction act
© Gary Cole

The US Department of the Treasury and the IRS announced this week final rules on prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements under the Inflation Reduction Act. These rules aim to support the US Administration’s goal of creating well-paying clean energy jobs and expanding the clean energy workforce.

“President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act has driven an investment boom while ensuring that workers benefit from good pay and new opportunities to get ahead,” stated Treasury Secretary Janet L. Yellen. The Act is projected to create over 1.5 million jobs in the next decade, with more than 270,000 jobs already announced.

Acting Secretary of Labor Julie Su emphasized that the new rules ensure tax breaks provide tangible benefits to workers, including fair wages and training opportunities. Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm highlighted the nationwide clean energy manufacturing boom, which supports good-paying jobs and careers.

The final rules clarify that taxpayers must pay prevailing wages and hire registered apprentices to qualify for increased tax credits. This will incentivize clean energy projects and ensure compliance with high labor standards. For example, in Wisconsin, agreements have been made with construction unions to employ union workers on utility-scale solar, wind, and battery storage projects.

The IRS will dedicate resources to promoting and enforcing compliance with these new rules, ensuring that clean energy projects meet their obligations. An interactive map by the Department of Labor shows the estimated number of workers benefiting from these projects nationwide.

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